Rancière does not consider dissensus at all simply as an opposition or deviation in content, but rather specifically as disobedience towards the distribution of the sensible and the socially striated space, the revolt against the form of police, the usurpation of equality: “Dissensus is the introduction of a fact into a sphere of sensible experience that is incompatible with it, contradicts it.”
Art & Encounter at Festival of Live Art
Footscray Community Art Centre
Saturday 15 March 2014

A new annual symposium, Art & Encounter aims to generate lively public discussion and rigorous debate on key issues in socially-engaged, participatory and live art today. In 2014 the symposium launches with the idea of what happens ‘beyond audience development’, and asks the question: ‘Why do artists engage the public in participation?’ Amy Spiers and James Oliver invite artists and artist researchers working in the expanded field of participatory art to join them in exploring these concerns. Participants will have an opportunity to reflect on the cultural, social and political dimensions of participatory art in the public realm. 
(via Art & Encounter | Festival of Live Art)

Art & Encounter at Festival of Live Art
Footscray Community Art Centre
Saturday 15 March 2014

A new annual symposium, Art & Encounter aims to generate lively public discussion and rigorous debate on key issues in socially-engaged, participatory and live art today. In 2014 the symposium launches with the idea of what happens ‘beyond audience development’, and asks the question: ‘Why do artists engage the public in participation?’ Amy Spiers and James Oliver invite artists and artist researchers working in the expanded field of participatory art to join them in exploring these concerns. Participants will have an opportunity to reflect on the cultural, social and political dimensions of participatory art in the public realm.
(via Art & Encounter | Festival of Live Art)

Nothing To See Here (Dispersal) at the Festival of Live Art
Arts House, North Melbourne Town Hall and Meat market
Sunday 23 March 2014

Around the world, protests and public gatherings are often broken up by police. Nothing To See Here (Dispersal) is a choreography of crowd dispersal, created in consultation with people who have real-life experience of the techniques police use to break up protests. Arts House patrons will be circulated away from areas in and around the Meat Market and North Melbourne Town Hall, leaving behind cleared-out spaces in which there is ‘nothing to see’. 

Lead Artists Amy Spiers & Catherine Ryan
Consulting Choreographer & Dramaturge Ashley Dyer 
(via Nothing To See Here (Dispersal) | Festival of Live Art)

Nothing To See Here (Dispersal) at the Festival of Live Art
Arts House, North Melbourne Town Hall and Meat market
Sunday 23 March 2014

Around the world, protests and public gatherings are often broken up by police. Nothing To See Here (Dispersal) is a choreography of crowd dispersal, created in consultation with people who have real-life experience of the techniques police use to break up protests. Arts House patrons will be circulated away from areas in and around the Meat Market and North Melbourne Town Hall, leaving behind cleared-out spaces in which there is ‘nothing to see’.

Lead Artists Amy Spiers & Catherine Ryan
Consulting Choreographer & Dramaturge Ashley Dyer
(via Nothing To See Here (Dispersal) | Festival of Live Art)

I could hear my heart beating,” wrote Ray Carver. “I could hear everyone’s heart. I could hear the human noise we sat there making, not one of us moving, not even when the room went dark.
But the problem is that struggles like these are never over. Not in our lifetime not in our children’s or their children’s. The struggles against homophobia, racism, patriarchy, poverty, etc. are not resolvable. It is kind of depressing to think that I’m not ever going to lie in the sun and relax and forget about patriarchy. Its true, though, I’m not. So we want destinations, we want final results. Of course we never accomplish the final results we want. We accomplish some other results. I’ve always thought that political actions are never effective. I mean the protests against the Vietnam war didn’t stop the Vietnam war, the military campaign stopped the Vietnam war. The Vietnam war protests served another purpose that produced something else than the successful end of the war. They were very well organized protests, they had very clear cut goals, clear cut ends, but they never achieved them. Which doesn’t mean they weren’t successful. They were successful but in doing something else. And that’s always the case, that’s always what politics are about. You never quite know what it is you’re accomplishing until afterward, and its never what you set out to achieve.
A truly public Midan al-Tahrir would have been feared as a threat to regime security, and so over the years the state deployed the physical design of urban space as one of its chief means of discouraging democracy. In Tahrir this meant erecting fences and subdividing open areas into manageable plots of grass and sidewalks. To cite one prominent example: the large portion of the square that fronts the Egyptian museum was, until the 1960s, a grassy plaza with crisscrossing paths and a grand fountain. Here families and students would gather throughout the day; it was also a notorious meeting point for lovers on a date in the heart of the city. But in the 1970s, the government fenced off the area—and more, it never offered any clear explanation of what was to be the fate of this favorite meeting spot. Cairenes speculated that perhaps it was closed to allow for construction of the Cairo Metro or other infrastructure projects. Sometime in the past decade a sign appeared, announcing that a multi-level underground parking garage was being built. During the protests in Tahrir Square, activists took down the fence and used it to build barricades to protect themselves from the attacks of pro-Mubarak thugs—and the removal of the fence revealed that none of the promised construction had ever taken place. The area had been taken away from the public sphere precisely to avoid the possibility of large crowds congregating in Tahrir. Such was Mubarak’s urban planning legacy.
A Met spokesman said: “We accept and understand the negative visual impact that water cannons create and concerns around the potential for them to cause injuries,” but added: “When faced with major criminality taking place… it is our duty to keep the peace and Londoners safe. We strongly believe that this tactic will help us to do this.”
Then as now, the minister refused to release the video of the operation. The navy videos everything. Then, as now, obscure “operational” reasons were said to make it impossible to put the evidence on the table. (via Burnt hands, children overboard, it all seems the same to Peter Reith | David Marr | Comment is free | theguardian.com)

Then as now, the minister refused to release the video of the operation. The navy videos everything. Then, as now, obscure “operational” reasons were said to make it impossible to put the evidence on the table. (via Burnt hands, children overboard, it all seems the same to Peter Reith | David Marr | Comment is free | theguardian.com)